leupagus:

aurelie-dupont:

American Ballet Theatre corps Kaho Ogawa 10 pirouettes

Friendly reminder that if you ever use the term “ballerina” as a pejorative, you deserved to get kicked in the kneecaps by one. And trust me she’ll do damage.

leupagus:

aurelie-dupont:

American Ballet Theatre corps Kaho Ogawa 10 pirouettes

Friendly reminder that if you ever use the term “ballerina” as a pejorative, you deserved to get kicked in the kneecaps by one. And trust me she’ll do damage.

thempress:

People look down on McDonald’s employees but fail to realize that if all these folks left McDonald’s and pursued “better careers”  your ass wouldn’t be able to get a McDouble with an Oreo McFlurry at 3am. 

You can’t demand a service while simultaneously degrading those who provide it for you. 

sometimes it’s really hard not to hate this country.

People aren’t talkin about the news, they’re talking about what they think the news is. There is no news channel saying “This is what happened, draw your own conclusions.” We have made this country so bereft of critical thinking, that now we have a problem where we have to teach them to think for themselves.

We have no unified authority, or problem solvers. We have congressman discussing environmentalism, when they don’t understand half the problems our earth is going through. We go to congress instead of going to people who have worked their whole LIFE trying to solve these problems. When it comes to racism, we’re asking a panel of white dudes, when it comes to sexism and woman’s rights we ask a panel of white priests on what they think. IT’S INSANITY! We ask people who are not in the arena they should be speaking in/for.

AND THAT’S WHY WE DON’T trust the media, it’s because they’re not in the arena of black experience, and they don’t care about the black experience, UNTIL something bad happens and they have the tools to paint us as destructive, ugly and evil!

(Source: theyuniversity)

But let’s get something straight: a community pushing back against a murderous police force that is terrorizing them is not a “riot”. It’s an uprising. It’s a rebellion. It’s a community saying We can’t take this anymore. We won’t take it. It’s people who have been dehumanized to the point of rightful rage. And it happens all over the world. Uprisings and rebellions are necessary and inevitable, locally and globally. This is not to say that actual riots don’t happen. White folks riot at sporting events, for example. Riots happen. But people rising up in righteous anger and rage in the face of oppression should not be dismissed as simply a “riot”.

Don’t be distracted by terms like “rioting”. Whether you’re for or against uprising and rebellion (side-eye if you’re against it, though), it’s a tool, not the issue itself. The issue is yet another Black teenager murdered by police. His name was Mike Brown.

bobbycaputo:

Here’s Why We Need to Protect Public Libraries

We live in a “diverse and often fractious country,” writes Robert Dawson, but there are some things that unite us—among them, our love of libraries. “A locally governed and tax-supported system that dispenses knowledge and information for everyone throughout the country at no cost to its patrons is an astonishing thing,” the photographer writes in the introduction to his book, The Public Library: A Photographic Essay. “It is a shared commons of our ambitions, our dreams, our memories, our culture, and ourselves.”

But what do these places look like? Over the course of 18 years, Dawson found out. Inspired by “the long history of photographic survey projects,” he traveled thousands of miles and photographed hundreds of public libraries in nearly all 50 states. Looking at the photos, the conclusion is unavoidable: American libraries are as diverse as Americans. They’re large and small, old and new, urban and rural, and in poor and wealthy communities. Architecturally, they represent a range of styles, from the grand main branch of the New York Public Library to the humble trailer that serves as a library in Death Valley National Park, the hottest place on Earth. “Because they’re all locally funded, libraries reflect the communities they’re in,” Dawson said in an interview. “The diversity reflects who we are as a people.”

(Continue Reading)

roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders was delighted to learn about the work of Buckinghamshire, England-based illustrator Chloe Giordano, who uses freehand embroidery to create incredibly small, yet finely detailed depictions of animals.

The final works of a sleeping fawn or mouse are scarcely larger than the size of a thimble, yet can take long periods of time to complete as she mixes myriad thread colors to achieve perfection for each piece.

In addition to wonderfully wee embroidered pieces like those pictured here, Giordano also creates 3D sculptures. You can keep up with all of Chloe Giordano’s artwork right here on Tumblr at karenin. She’s currently available for comission-based work as well.

[via Colossal]

WOWWOW

hemidemisplemmyquaver:

I don’t think google gets enough credit sometimes

hemidemisplemmyquaver:

I don’t think google gets enough credit sometimes

one-hella-fine-viking:

loldork:

Depressing thought: in a 100 years almost everyone that’s alive now will be dead and the world will be inhabited by 10 billion or so completely new people.

not so depressing thought: maybe these new people will be less bigoted, sexist and racist.

Peter’s first meeting with the TARDIS (i suppose)
[x]

(Source: capaldilieu)

deltaqoodrem:

Michelle Rodriguez laying down truths
[x]