We go to war based on less evidence than prosecutors are demanding before charging Darren Wilson for killing Mike Brown.

obiwanskenobi:

If we can’t write diversity into sci-fi, then what’s the point? You don’t create new worlds to give them all the same limits of the old ones. (quote)

officeofnerd:

150 year old Victorian prosthetic hand. Not creepy at all. 

Groovy.

officeofnerd:

150 year old Victorian prosthetic hand. Not creepy at all. 

Groovy.

(Source: waliszewska)

thymoss:

railroadsoftware:

no one ever says that Rome needed help from aliens to build their empire

#l laughed for days when i found out that #ancient egyptians used water to reduce friction and move blocks for distances #and that this was literally DEPICTED ON THEIR HIEROGLYPHICS #but ~western archaeologists~ #thought that the pouring of water depicted ~superstitious rituals~ #jfc

janeeyretaughtmeromance:

My Top 10 Female Characters on Television - 

    8/10 : Lieutenant Abbie Mills - Sleepy Hollow

    “You have one choice right now: that is to tell me something, anything, that will help me find her, or so help me, I will rain legal brimstone down on you so hard it will make God jealous. ”

squidsqueen:

What makes me so happy about this is that she isn’t telling you you must love your body or that you are obligated to. She saying you have permission to. And that’s important, because there are a lot of reasons why people have trouble with self-love.  But the idea that you aren’t supposed to love your body, that you aren’t allowed to for whatever reason, needs to be crushed. If you can’t love you body right now, if your body causes you pain or disphoria or distress, you aren’t required to love it. But you are ALLOWED to. You are entitled to the chance to make peace with your body, if you ever reach a point where you are ready to. No one else should be trying to stop you.

(Source: beyxnika)

sagansense:

For those who missed it, NPR interviewed Neil deGrasse Tyson (Astrophysicist, Director of the Hayden Planetarium in the Rose Center for Earth and Space at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in NYC and host of the new 13-part television series, 'Cosmos: A Space Time Odyssey’) in a segment called ‘Neil DeGrasse Tyson Explains Why The Cosmos Shouldn’t Make You Feel Small’.
NPR interview highlights:
On how to balance science and show biz…[I don’t think] that one of the two has to be compromised for the both to be successful, I don’t agree with that premise. I think if you have not thought deeply of how to communicate science you might get stuck saying, “OK, I have to dumb this down. I have to be flashy but with no real content.” But if you really think deeply about the visualizations, the visual effects and the content, you get to have both.
On what Gravity got wrong…Cosmos has as its priority to get the science right, above all else, and we will then tell the story with the properly represented science. In Hollywood … I think they take some latitudes, either out of ignorance, or because they feel as though the truth would somehow constrain their flexibility of storytelling.
In the film Gravity … I just felt compelled to put out 10 tweets or so on things I thought they could’ve gotten right but they didn’t get right. … One of which was, why is it that Sandra Bullock, who is portraying a medical doctor, is fixing my Hubble Space Telescope! Get her the hell off my telescope! As an astrophysicist I don’t walk into her operating room and say, “I got this.” … So little things like that, and I was just having fun.
… For example, her hair — her hair should’ve been sort of floating in zero-G and it was not. It was like heavy mousse, or something, that kept that stuff down. … That’s the first thing we notice when we see astronauts floating in space is the hair sticking up and it’s kind of comical and funny, it’s the great reminder that they’re in zero-G.
On Pluto losing its status as a planet…So Pluto is not only the littlest planet, all right, that alone shouldn’t hurt it, but more than half of its volume is ice. No other planet has that. So if you moved it to where Earth is right now, heat from the sun would evaporate the ice and it would grow a tail. That’s no kind of behavior for a planet!
Pluto, its orbit is elongated so severely that it crosses the orbit of Neptune. Now, we have words for objects that cross the orbits of other planets and are made of mostly ice; they’re called comets. By the way, there are six moons in the solar system that are bigger than Pluto including Earth’s moon, which is five times the mass of Pluto. So really, Pluto was never the ninth planet, it was the first of a new class of objects that we didn’t really discover the rest of until the early 1990s.
On the big questions astronomers are trying to answer…We can measure the influence of this thing we call dark energy which is forcing an acceleration of the expanding universe. We don’t know what that is, we don’t know anything about it, other than what it’s doing to the universe.
Then 85 percent of the gravity of the universe has a point of origin about which we know nothing. We account for all the matter and energy that we’re familiar with, measure up how much gravity it should have, it’s about one-sixth of the gravity that’s actually operating on the universe. We call that dark matter, but what we should call it is “dark gravity.” We don’t know what that is either.
We don’t know how [Earth] went from inanimate organic molecules to self-replicating life. We got top people working on that as well.
We don’t know what was around before the universe. We don’t know what is at the center of a black hole. We don’t know whether or not the universe is actually one of many in a multiverse. We want to know if there’s life thriving in under ice oceans of Jupiter’s moon Europa.
… But my favorite question is one that we don’t even know to ask yet because it’s a question that would arise upon answering these questions I just delivered to you. … If you’re a scientist and you have to have an answer, even in the absence of data, you’re not going to be a good scientist.
On becoming an “innovation nation”…When we find an asteroid headed our way, what’s your first thought? Is it “run!” or “stockpile toilet paper!”? No. If that’s your first thought, you are not an innovation nation. If you have enough people who are influenced by this way of thinking, the innovative way of thinking, their first thought is, “How do we deflect that asteroid? How do we destroy that asteroid? How do we mine that asteroid?” … That’s a culture that I don’t think the United States is a part of right now.
On the “cosmic perspective”…You will never find people who truly grasp the cosmic perspective … leading nations into battle. No, that doesn’t happen. When you have a cosmic perspective there’s this little speck called Earth and you say, “You’re going to what? You’re on this side of a line in the sand and you want to kill people for what? Oh, to pull oil out of the ground, what? WHAT?” … Not enough people in this world, I think, carry a cosmic perspective with them. It could be life changing.
On how he (very) briefly considered a career as an exotic dancer…You’re broke in graduate school, basically, and I was flexible from having danced and I was pretty cut from having wrestled, and I also rode and so on the dance team there were some fellow male dancers who told me about this club, these ladies’ club but there are these male dancers, and they said they danced moves we do just in the normal training for our dance performances … and they invited me because I needed more money, I was broke.
So I went just to observe it [to see] if it was something I could do and they came out with jock straps having been soaked in lighter fluid, asbestos jock straps, ignited, coming out dancing to Jerry Lee Lewis’ “Great Balls of Fire.”
I said, “Nope. Not for me.” I’m embarrassed to say that it wasn’t until that moment when I said to myself, “Maybe I should be a math tutor.” I don’t know why I didn’t think of that first.
Read/listen to the entire 38:28 interview HERE.
In other “Cosmos-related" news….Fox & Nat Geo To Preview ‘Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey’ At Inaugural White House Film Festival [via Deadline]

sagansense:

For those who missed it, NPR interviewed Neil deGrasse Tyson (Astrophysicist, Director of the Hayden Planetarium in the Rose Center for Earth and Space at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in NYC and host of the new 13-part television series, 'Cosmos: A Space Time Odyssey) in a segment called Neil DeGrasse Tyson Explains Why The Cosmos Shouldn’t Make You Feel Small.

NPR interview highlights:

imageOn how to balance science and show biz…
[I don’t think] that one of the two has to be compromised for the both to be successful, I don’t agree with that premise. I think if you have not thought deeply of how to communicate science you might get stuck saying, “OK, I have to dumb this down. I have to be flashy but with no real content.” But if you really think deeply about the visualizations, the visual effects and the content, you get to have both.

imageOn what Gravity got wrong…
Cosmos has as its priority to get the science right, above all else, and we will then tell the story with the properly represented science. In Hollywood … I think they take some latitudes, either out of ignorance, or because they feel as though the truth would somehow constrain their flexibility of storytelling.

In the film Gravity … I just felt compelled to put out 10 tweets or so on things I thought they could’ve gotten right but they didn’t get right. … One of which was, why is it that Sandra Bullock, who is portraying a medical doctor, is fixing my Hubble Space Telescope! Get her the hell off my telescope! As an astrophysicist I don’t walk into her operating room and say, “I got this.” … So little things like that, and I was just having fun.

… For example, her hair — her hair should’ve been sort of floating in zero-G and it was not. It was like heavy mousse, or something, that kept that stuff down. … That’s the first thing we notice when we see astronauts floating in space is the hair sticking up and it’s kind of comical and funny, it’s the great reminder that they’re in zero-G.

imageOn Pluto losing its status as a planet…
So Pluto is not only the littlest planet, all right, that alone shouldn’t hurt it, but more than half of its volume is ice. No other planet has that. So if you moved it to where Earth is right now, heat from the sun would evaporate the ice and it would grow a tail. That’s no kind of behavior for a planet!

Pluto, its orbit is elongated so severely that it crosses the orbit of Neptune. Now, we have words for objects that cross the orbits of other planets and are made of mostly ice; they’re called comets. By the way, there are six moons in the solar system that are bigger than Pluto including Earth’s moon, which is five times the mass of Pluto. So really, Pluto was never the ninth planet, it was the first of a new class of objects that we didn’t really discover the rest of until the early 1990s.

imageOn the big questions astronomers are trying to answer…
We can measure the influence of this thing we call dark energy which is forcing an acceleration of the expanding universe. We don’t know what that is, we don’t know anything about it, other than what it’s doing to the universe.

Then 85 percent of the gravity of the universe has a point of origin about which we know nothing. We account for all the matter and energy that we’re familiar with, measure up how much gravity it should have, it’s about one-sixth of the gravity that’s actually operating on the universe. We call that dark matter, but what we should call it is “dark gravity.” We don’t know what that is either.

We don’t know how [Earth] went from inanimate organic molecules to self-replicating life. We got top people working on that as well.

We don’t know what was around before the universe. We don’t know what is at the center of a black hole. We don’t know whether or not the universe is actually one of many in a multiverse. We want to know if there’s life thriving in under ice oceans of Jupiter’s moon Europa.

… But my favorite question is one that we don’t even know to ask yet because it’s a question that would arise upon answering these questions I just delivered to you. … If you’re a scientist and you have to have an answer, even in the absence of data, you’re not going to be a good scientist.

imageOn becoming an “innovation nation”…
When we find an asteroid headed our way, what’s your first thought? Is it “run!” or “stockpile toilet paper!”? No. If that’s your first thought, you are not an innovation nation. If you have enough people who are influenced by this way of thinking, the innovative way of thinking, their first thought is, “How do we deflect that asteroid? How do we destroy that asteroid? How do we mine that asteroid?” … That’s a culture that I don’t think the United States is a part of right now.

imageOn the “cosmic perspective”…
You will never find people who truly grasp the cosmic perspective … leading nations into battle. No, that doesn’t happen. When you have a cosmic perspective there’s this little speck called Earth and you say, “You’re going to what? You’re on this side of a line in the sand and you want to kill people for what? Oh, to pull oil out of the ground, what? WHAT?” … Not enough people in this world, I think, carry a cosmic perspective with them. It could be life changing.

imageOn how he (very) briefly considered a career as an exotic dancer…
You’re broke in graduate school, basically, and I was flexible from having danced and I was pretty cut from having wrestled, and I also rode and so on the dance team there were some fellow male dancers who told me about this club, these ladies’ club but there are these male dancers, and they said they danced moves we do just in the normal training for our dance performances … and they invited me because I needed more money, I was broke.

So I went just to observe it [to see] if it was something I could do and they came out with jock straps having been soaked in lighter fluid, asbestos jock straps, ignited, coming out dancing to Jerry Lee Lewis’ “Great Balls of Fire.”

I said, “Nope. Not for me.” I’m embarrassed to say that it wasn’t until that moment when I said to myself, “Maybe I should be a math tutor.” I don’t know why I didn’t think of that first.

Read/listen to the entire 38:28 interview HERE.

In other “Cosmos-related" news….Fox & Nat Geo To Preview ‘Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey’ At Inaugural White House Film Festival [via Deadline]

"We need to recognize that for some people sex is great and for some sex is horrific and for some it’s on par with folding laundry."

deviantfemme:

dotterall:

(~Sex Isn’t Always Good by queenieofaces)

This is a critical part of sex positivity that tends to be overlooked. Let’s celebrate empowering amazing sex and the choice to not have sex, or only have certain kinds of sex. 

awrogersno:

Chris Evans talks about passing the Human Torch to Michael B. Jordan

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.

Links:

Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart

Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story

You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

gotopsy:

juliedillon:

This is an illustration I did for the August 2014 issue of Popular Science Magazine. The assignment was to show a scifi take on human aging in the future. I wanted to do something relatively positive, so I drew a lady whose life has been been prolonged through cybernetic enhancements and augmentation, so she gets to spend time with her great-great-great-great grandchildren. 
Thanks to AD Michelle Mruk!

Wonderful!  You have a lot of talent!

gotopsy:

juliedillon:

This is an illustration I did for the August 2014 issue of Popular Science Magazine. The assignment was to show a scifi take on human aging in the future. I wanted to do something relatively positive, so I drew a lady whose life has been been prolonged through cybernetic enhancements and augmentation, so she gets to spend time with her great-great-great-great grandchildren. 

Thanks to AD Michelle Mruk!

Wonderful!  You have a lot of talent!

athos: (▰˘◡˘▰)

(Source: p0rth0s)

dontbearuiner:

felixkins:

elysean:

They said you might come.

#This scene makes me so sad#because above all else#above UNIT and Torchwood#and even the Doctor#SHE was a doctor#Martha Jones helped people - her passion was to heal#and save lives#and now she might be the only one who can save the universe#but at the cost of the entire planet#she’ll kill them all#and it’s the last thing that she wants to do#but it’s the only option now#so when this woman pulls the gun on her and threatens to kill her#Martha sadly nods her head and tells her to do it#because then she wouldn’t have to make this choice#and it kills me

oh my god martha nearly did to the earth what the doctor did to gallifrey

oh my god

This is the exact reason why I maintain my position that Martha was not, under any circumstances, the companion.

She was the doctor.

Now I know that he’s always the same man at the core after regenerations  so on and so forth, but when it really boils down, the doctor isn’t a timelord, the doctor is an idea. At least in the RTD era, every companion at one point or another, has had to make the choice to become the doctor.

Rose Became the Doctor when she accepted her fate as the bad wolf.

Mickey became the doctor when he stayed in the parallel universe.

Donna became the doctor during the meta-crisis.

Jack became the doctor when he ‘died’  for the first time trying to save everyone before Rose destroyed the Daleks.

But Martha? Martha was different, Martha was special. Martha never chose to become the doctor, because that was who she always was in her heart; and substantially she was the only companion of the RTD era who didn’t need to be saved by either the timelord doctor or TARDIS intervention (in the case of Jack, seeing as it was the badwolf, who brought him back).

^^^^^^

THAT COMMENTARY IS GORGEOUS.